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#11
IDNet Help / Re: Number redirection - what ...
Last post by zappaDPJ - Jun 23, 2024, 12:34:43
Quote from: Postal on Jun 23, 2024, 09:06:15The big caveat to doing it with your existing connection is a further complication of the way that phone and broadband are packed together by the suppliers. 

That's one issue we won't have to face. We stopped using a landline phone a couple of years ago and the only question it raised is why we didn't do it twenty years ago.

I know some people still rely on it but for us there was really no downside.
#12
Networking & Routers / Re: Networking solution help
Last post by nowster - Jun 23, 2024, 09:36:23
Higher spec Ethernet cables are a waste of money if it's very unlikely you'll go over 1Gbps.

The main difference between the various CAT ratings is the number of twists per inch in each differential pair (and hence how much copper is used).

2.5Gbps Ethernet is starting to be more common, but 10Gbps is currently quite power hungry.

On the other hand, the advantage of installing higher rated cabling is that you don't have to replace it if you want to upgrade later... but by that point you might be wanting to replace it with fibre optic instead.
#13
IDNet Help / Re: Number redirection - what ...
Last post by Postal - Jun 23, 2024, 09:06:15
Quote from: zappaDPJ on Jun 19, 2024, 22:13:34That's certainly something I wouldn't want.


Unfortunately it is the norm with many of the new suppliers (and even existing suppliers who are running out of IPv4 addresses).  The new network provider currently fibreing our village does not provide IPv6 (it is in the plans, honest) and uses CGNAT for IPv4 unless you pay £5 extra per month for a fixed IPv4 address.

However, even on an ADSL/VDSL package there is no need to retain the landline telephone.  You can just transfer the number to one of the current VoIP providers and then use the providers app to set up how you want to receive or make calls.  This could be a traditional handset type phone wired through an adapter to your router, your mobile with the app set to receive the calls to the old landline number or whatever.  Going down this route gives you the freedom to control your own destiny rather than having the number tied to an ISP with all the hoohah of contracts tying together phone and broadband; this is the equivalent process to having an independent e-mail address (gmail, hotmail etc or your own domain) so that you do not have to reset all of your internet accounts with banks, utilities, businesses etc each time you move ISP.

The big caveat to doing it with your existing connection is a further complication of the way that phone and broadband are packed together by the suppliers.  Moving the phone away automatically ceases the whole broadband/phone package.  If you do it at any time except the end of the current contract term you may be hit with termination charges.  You will also need to create a new broadband only contract with your existing or a new supplier.

We will certainly be splitting out our phone from our broadband when fibre arrives and new contracts are needed so even if we stop with IDNet they will no longer provide our phone.
#14
IDNet Help / Re: FTTP provider options - ar...
Last post by Postal - Jun 23, 2024, 08:44:43
One thing to remember is that there is currently a plethora of venture capital funded companies installing fibre networks around the country.  In the nature of venture capitalism the aim is to invest, grow the investment then sell on so many of the smaller network companies will only have a limited shelf life before they are taken over by one of the major players.

In the meantime each of the smaller providers runs its own fibre to your house to its ONT (Optical Network Termination).  This is the fibre equivalent of the old style telephone master socket and similarly to the master socket the ONT is the demarcation point between the network and the customer.  If you move between fibre networks you get a new fibre to your property and new ONT each time.  You are not allowed to remove the previous ONT as it is not your property (and the owning provider will wish to retain the physical equipment on site in case the current or future resident wishes to access their services again and they won't have to re-do the physical installation) so you could end up with a line of ONTs along the internal wall.

If you go with some of the smaller network suppliers they only have a limited range of ISPs who can access their services - the provider currently fibreing our village restricts you to using their own ISP.  BT have now announced that we are also in their roll-out plans but when the BT fibre arrives we will have the choice of a multitude of ISPs through the one ONT in the same way as a BT telephone line allows access to lots of ISP FTTC connections.
#15
Networking & Routers / Re: Networking solution help
Last post by Bill - Jun 23, 2024, 08:42:06
Quote from: robinc on Jun 23, 2024, 06:25:42The transmission frequency of 500MHz is important if you need to work over long distances. CAT 6 will give you 10Gbps over 150 ft whereas CAT 6a with double the transmission frequency will give you the same rate up to 300 ft (slightly rounded numbers).  I thought it worth a mention.  :) 6a is also far more robust at handling cross talk but that is going to be unlikely inn this scenario.
That's a new one on me, thanks :thumb:

I don't think it's ever likely to be relevant to anything I do, but you can never tell- new knowledge seldom comes amiss  :)
#16
Networking & Routers / Re: Networking solution help
Last post by robinc - Jun 23, 2024, 06:25:42
Quote from: Bill on Jun 22, 2024, 08:14:57Thanks for the emphatic endorsement- I've never used a WAP so wasn't 100% sure my answer was sensible :D

A question if I may- what does "10Gbps @ 500MHz" mean? The 10Gps is obvious, but I don't see the relevance of 500MHz ???
The transmission frequency of 500MHz is important if you need to work over long distances. CAT 6 will give you 10Gbps over 150 ft whereas CAT 6a with double the transmission frequency will give you the same rate up to 300 ft (slightly rounded numbers).  I thought it worth a mention.  :) 6a is also far more robust at handling cross talk but that is going to be unlikely inn this scenario.
#17
Networking & Routers / Re: Networking solution help
Last post by zappaDPJ - Jun 23, 2024, 01:36:19

Thanks, I really appreciate all the help I'm getting with this. I'm fine with the audio side of things but I've always had a bit of lazy mind when it comes to networking and company subcontracted to do all my cabling appears to have the same mind set.
#18
Networking & Routers / Re: Networking solution help
Last post by nowster - Jun 22, 2024, 22:44:04
You're best putting in CAT5a or better and putting an Access Point in the room, wired back to an Ethernet port on the router.

Powerline is very variable in reliability. WiFi mesh extenders only work if there's a WiFi signal for it to relay.

The AP doesn't have to be expensive. You could use one of the £45 GL.iNet travel routers in AP mode. The base "Opal" model is good up to about 300Mbps on the 5GHz band and can also act as a three port network switch. (This is what I've used at my parents.)
#19
Networking & Routers / Re: Networking solution help
Last post by Bill - Jun 22, 2024, 17:08:47
That's some serious isolation you're installing, sounds halfway to a TEMPEST-proofed job :D

I didn't realise there were two areas involved... I think that because of the degree of isolation I'd be inclined to go for a full monty approach- cable to Area-1 into a switch, WAP into one port. Cable from a second port to a switch in Area-2, another WAP. Then you're confident of good wireless signal in both areas regardless of what the sound insulation might do to it, and you can use wifi calling on the mobile in both areas.

Not sure about running 2 WAPs on one LAN potentially within range of each other, but I'd think that running one on 2.4Gig and the other on 5Gig would be OK... someone else might like to comment.

Pick switches with enough ports to suit anticipated requirements plus a bit more, they're not expensive.
#20
Networking & Routers / Re: Networking solution help
Last post by zappaDPJ - Jun 22, 2024, 14:40:23
There is a range issue but in addition as soon as I enter the main studio area I lose WiFi and mobile signal. It's because the entire area including the floors and ceilings have been soundproofed with multiple layers of various materials.

The mains into the area is totally isolated from the rest of the house and runs though a power conditioner so I don't think a mesh system would work but thanks for the suggestion.

I have all the tools needed to make Cat 6a cables and there's a fairly easy run from my router taking an external route into the control room area of the studio and then into a switch.

Would I then be able to take a cable from the switch into the live room (via a signal pass-though bay) and plug in a wired WiFi extender? In addition is it possible to plug a second WiFi extender directly into the switch so I'd have an extender in both areas?